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Recently, Vogue came under fire for their diversity issue featuring white model Karlie Kloss as a geisha.

This instance of yellow face is indicative of a wider problem: cultural appropriation. The fashion world takes aspects of POC style and culture and divorces them from their identity; it’s rare for POC to actually be featured in their own style. So imagine our surprise when we saw Vogue’s 125th Anniversary Issue features badass Chicanas and Latinas from East Los Angeles.

From left to right: Maya Martinez, Dorys “Dee” Araniva, Dora Araniva, and Dianna Araniva. Dorys grew up in South Central L.A.; a mother of three (her eldest serves in the US Army), she founded a clothing company called DXCollective two years ago as an artistic outlet: the designs incorporate her love for graffiti, tattoo art and Los Angeles/Chicano culture. Photographed by Stefan Ruiz; Vogue.com
From left to right: Maya Martinez, Dorys “Dee” Araniva, Dora Araniva, and Dianna Araniva. Dorys grew up in South Central L.A.; a mother of three (her eldest serves in the US Army), she founded a clothing company called DXCollective two years ago as an artistic outlet: the designs incorporate her love for graffiti, tattoo art and Los Angeles/Chicano culture. Photographed by Stefan Ruiz; Vogue.com

Excerpt from Vogue.Com— “Across the Southwest and especially in L.A., retro references have long been a vital element of Latina style. But throwback looks are not merely data points in fashion’s larger recycling of eras, cuts, and proportions.

‘A lot of young Chicanos want to connect to their history,’ explained John Carlos De Luna, a vintage clothing dealer and the owner of Barrio Dandy Vintage, a showroom in Boyle Heights.

‘Inherently they’re connecting to an America that didn’t really accept them, an America that looked down on them. There’s such power in that— to own that history.’

Isabella Ferrada is an artist, model and aspiring cinematographer. Her makeup and style is a mix of inspiration from drag culture, her mother and aunts in the 1980s and 90s, and her friends who she describes as "a group of young, queer, woke brown artists.” She wears a top from Mujerista Market designed by her friend, Salina Zazueta-Beltrán. Photographed in Westlake, Los Angeles. Photographed by Stefan Ruiz; Vogue.com
Isabella Ferrada is an artist, model and aspiring cinematographer. Her makeup and style is a mix of inspiration from drag culture, her mother and aunts in the 1980s and 90s, and her friends who she describes as “a group of young, queer, woke brown artists.” She wears a top from Mujerista Market designed by her friend, Salina Zazueta-Beltrán. Photographed in Westlake, Los Angeles. Photographed by Stefan Ruiz; Vogue.com

‘I love the stuff my mom used to be into in high school,’ Sailor Gonzalez, one of the interviewees, told Vogue. ‘I love the dramatic cholita eye makeup that my tías and mom used to wear. I find comfort when people feel nostalgic when they see my outfit.’ As our community heals and reflects, we reconnect with (or in some cases, newly discover) our history. Latinx and Chicanx youth imitating older styles are reaching out through history to connect with an America that’s never accepted us.'”

Ofelia Esparza, 85, is a master altar maker and lifelong resident of East Los Angeles. As an artist and educator, she has dedicated her life to her community and to continuing traditions she learned from her mother. She is well-known for the public ofrendas she creates each year in celebration of El Día de Los Muertos. She was photographed at Tonalli Studio, an art space she runs with her daughter, Rosanna, in Old Town Maravilla, in East L.A. Photographed by Stefan Ruiz; Vogue.com
Ofelia Esparza, 85, is a master altar maker and lifelong resident of East Los Angeles. As an artist and educator, she has dedicated her life to her community and to continuing traditions she learned from her mother. She is well-known for the public ofrendas she creates each year in celebration of El Día de Los Muertos. She was photographed at Tonalli Studio, an art space she runs with her daughter, Rosanna, in Old Town Maravilla, in East L.A. Photographed by Stefan Ruiz; Vogue.com
Maritza Amezcua and Sailor Gonzales have known each other since middle school. Photographed by Stefan Ruiz; Vogue.com
Maritza Amezcua and Sailor Gonzales have known each other since middle school. Photographed by Stefan Ruiz; Vogue.com

We’re pleasantly surprised by this insightful and accurate spread from Vogue. But don’t think we won’t side eye them for future grievances.

 

 

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